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Check out the following links to learn more about the importance of physical movement and how it pertains to education.

 

(Articles highlighted in gray boxes are features from the Society of Health and Physical Educators)

 

 

 

 

A trail to a healthier school

Prevent Obesity
SHAPE America member Jayne Greenberg, District Director of Physical Education and Health Literacy for Miami-Dade County Public Schools, explains the district’s innovative technology-based indoor fitness trail. To best serve their student population, the school district needed to think outside the box. “I came up with the idea to motivate classroom teachers to be more creative in implementing recess throughout the day. There was also a need to get students active during classroom activity breaks,” Jayne explains. This is how the technology-based indoor fitness trail idea, an innovative recess program that uses technology to get students physically active, was born.

 

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Weight, exercise may affect children’s thinking skills

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HealthDay News
Children’s weight and physical activity levels may affect their thinking and learning skills, a new study suggests. As expected, active, normal-weight kids had less body fat and a lower resting heart rate than overweight, inactive children. But the researchers also found that normal-weight active children did better on tests of mental skills — such as planning and paying attention — than their inactive counterparts. READ MORE

 

Cutting sugar improves children’s health in just 10 days

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The New York Times
Obese children who cut back on their sugar intake see improvements in their blood pressure, cholesterol readings and other markers of health after just 10 days, a rigorous new study found. The new research may help shed light on a question scientists have long debated: Is sugar itself harming health, or is the weight gain that comes from consuming sugary drinks and foods mainly what contributes to illness over the long term? READ MORE

 

New Jersey students lead wave of exercise

NJ.com
When Valley View Elementary School fifth-graders Sarina Dang and Elijah Dor led 60 of their peers through a high-energy workout before the start of school on Sept. 30, they started a wave of physical fitness activities among students across the country. The Valley View students were among those who were participating in a 10-hour coast-to-coast exercise event called Exercise US, which was developed by Montville, New Jersey physical education teacher Leonard Saunders to help battle childhood obesity.

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Sitting is bad for children, too

The New York Times
Children who sit too much may face adult-sized health consequences, according to a sobering new study of healthy young girls. The study found that after a single session of prolonged inactivity, the children developed changes in their blood flow and arteries that, in grown-ups, would signal the start of serious cardiovascular problems.

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For NJ students, the benefits of recess extend into classroom

By Carol Lynch and Jackie Malaska via NJ.com
Longtime SHAPE America members Carol Lynch and Jackie Malaska write: “What if we told you there is a way to increase children’s attention, focus, behavior and learning in the classroom while simultaneously helping to reduce increased rates of physical inactivity and obesity in our children today? There is: The answer is daily recess in our schools. The benefits of recess are numerous.”

 

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Exercise lowers depression risk in bullied teens

Science World Report
New findings revealed in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry show that exercise can help reduce sadness and even the potential of suicide in bullied adolescents. In a recent study, researchers analyzed data on over 13,500 adolescent in grades nine through 12. They examined the relationships between exercise frequency, suicidal ideation, sadness and attempts at suicide.

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California students exercise bodies and brains through active learning

The Mercury
Students are riding bicycles, sitting on balance balls and using indoor rowing machines all while in the classroom — and it’s not even for recess. Teachers in California’s Pottstown School District are incorporating action-based learning in their curriculum to keep children focused and motivated to learn. The learning style encourages students to move their bodies while they learn through various activities.

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Before-school exercise program seeks to stimulate young minds in Massachusetts

Wicked Local Plymouth
Massachusetts legislators, Plymouth town officials and business leaders interrupted their meeting about the health and well-being of local students recently and pretended to march in a band while beating a drum. When they finished, the civic leaders hopped around like popcorn kernels in a hot pan. The energy burst came courtesy of Build Our kids Success, a program of physical activity and nutrition that will be available in local elementary and middle schools this year.

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Moving (briskly even) beyond tired notions of PE

School Administrator
The leadership of John Skretta, superintendent of Norris School District in Firth, Nebraska, has ensured that wellness, nutrition and phys ed are given due consideration in budget decisions about curriculum, professional development and facilities. (Even master schedules have been adjusted to include two 10-minute activity breaks where students stretch during an activity like vocabulary study.) The district’s holistic approach to student health required, Skretta explains, that “we re-imagine how PE works within a school system.” His success in doing so has drawn national recognition to the Norris schools.

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 Why young kids need less class time — and more play time — at school

By Debbie Rhea via The Washington Post
Longtime SHAPE America member Debbie Rhea talks about the importance of allowing children to play more and sit less in school: “It seems counter-intuitive to think that less classroom time and more outdoor play would lead to a better education for kids. But longer time on task doesn’t equate to better results, only greater burnout. For years, educators have tried different unsuccessful strategies — more testing, more instruction — to reverse these trends. The answer, however, is not more class time. It’s more play.”

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Help students make the grade this school year through more physical activity

Department of Health and Human Services
Daily physical activity is vital for building healthy bodies and better brain power. But in the midst of the hustle and bustle of a new school year, how can parents help ensure that physical activity remains a priority for their child? In this week’s Be Active Your Way: Promoting Physical Activity blog, Betty Ann Fish introduces families to a Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program. Encouraging physical activity throughout the school day is the goal of a CSPAP. Many schools use a CSPAP — an approach supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and SHAPE America — Society of Health and Physical Educators. The school-wide model offers students opportunities to be physically active before, during and after school, in order to meet the nationally recommended 60 minutes of physical activity each day.

 

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Illinois district’s ‘new PE’ links physical, mental fitness

Union-Bulletin
Naperville, Illinois’ new PE program focuses on teaching the students a lifestyle of fitness, instead of just participating in athletics. Games are still played, but they are focused on keeping students active at their target heart rate zone. The school also schedules a PE classes before hard classes like math, science and English, so the brain can be at its peak to learn.

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Standing desks can reduce classroom behavior problems

PsychCentral
A new study finds students with standing desks are more attentive than their seated counterparts, and, as a bonus, the students burn more calories. Researchers from the Texas A&M School of Public Health found that the standing desks improved classroom attention-engagement by 12 percent, or an extra seven minutes per hour of engaged instruction time.

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What’s exercise deficit disorder?

LancasterOnline
How would a parent react if a child’s health care provider wrote a prescription that simply said “exercise”? This is certainly not what most parents expect from a checkup, but it may be coming. A new diagnosis is gaining popularity among pediatricians: “exercise deficit disorder” or EDD.

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Surgeon general wants to focus USA’s attention on preventing disease 

USA Today
As the “nation’s doctor,” Vivek Murthy, 37, now has the chance to try to keep patients out of the hospital on a grand scale. Murthy, who took office as U.S. Surgeon General in December, says he hopes to reduce chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes and heart disease by promoting physical activity. “The shift we have to make as a country is from one that is predominantly focused on treatment to one that is focused much more on prevention,” he says.

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University team studying impact of physical activity at elementary schools

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Fayette County Public Schools via KyForward
When Amber Livingood’s third-graders take a five-minute movement break, a University of Kentucky student watches closely as they clip on small pedometers and literally go through the motions. After the youngsters log their time and number of steps and then return to task, the college observer takes note of how often Livingood prompts the class or redirects a child and of their behavioral compliance — comparing the half-hour before and after the mid-class break. Later, the Livingood and others on her UK team will also review the students’ standardized test scores to gauge the effect of these brain breaks.READ MORE

West Virginia educators want to keep jumping programs in classrooms Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article

Logan Banner
Jumping can help children reap a lot of health benefits, according to several Logan County, West Virginia educators. Several teachers and a representative with the American Heart Association came to the Logan Board of Education meeting recently to speak about two physical activity programs they fear will be taken out of the classrooms of Logan County elementary schools. READ MORE

FUNtervals

Moving & Learning

Classroom Movement

 

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